ONLINE PASTORAL COUNSELING DEGREE – ACCREDITED DEGREE LIFE EXPERIENCE.

Online Pastoral Counseling Degree

online pastoral counseling degree

    pastoral counseling

  • (Pastoral Counselors) Mental health professionals who use religious resources in their treatment.
  • Pastoral counseling is a branch of counseling in which psychologically trained ministers, rabbis, priests and other non-ordained, lay persons provide therapy services.
  • (Pastoral counselor) A person who is trained to give spiritual and mental health advice.

    online

  • In or into operation or existence
  • on-line: on a regular route of a railroad or bus or airline system; “on-line industries”
  • on-line(a): being in progress now; “on-line editorial projects”
  • While so connected or under computer control
  • With processing of data carried out simultaneously with its production
  • on-line: connected to a computer network or accessible by computer; “an on-line database”

    degree

  • a specific identifiable position in a continuum or series or especially in a process; “a remarkable degree of frankness”; “at what stage are the social sciences?”
  • A unit of measurement of angles, one three-hundred-and-sixtieth of the circumference of a circle
  • A stage in a scale or series, in particular
  • The amount, level, or extent to which something happens or is present
  • a position on a scale of intensity or amount or quality; “a moderate grade of intelligence”; “a high level of care is required”; “it is all a matter of degree”
  • academic degree: an award conferred by a college or university signifying that the recipient has satisfactorily completed a course of study; “he earned his degree at Princeton summa cum laude”

online pastoral counseling degree – Introduction to

Introduction to Pastoral Counseling
Introduction to Pastoral Counseling

Grounded in empirical research and richly illustrated with case studies, this introduction continues the theoretical, practical, and theological expansion of Pastoral Care and Counseling. Because of increasing cultural diversity and the fact that more training is done outside of seminaries in non-seminary related colleges and universities, there is fragmentation in the discipline. This makes a coherent orientation to pastoral care and counseling as a ministry increasingly difficult. To address this confusion, author, Loren Townsend, calls us to readdress basic understandings. He also makes the case that pastoral identity can function as a unifying concept.

Crownsville State Hospital

Crownsville State Hospital
What looks like the main building of several making up the Crownsville State Hospital. The wikpedia article on this institution is fascinating:

The Crownsville Hospital Center is a former psychiatric hospital located in Crownsville, Maryland.

The facility was enabled by an act of the Maryland General Assembly on 11 April 1910 as the Hospital for the Negro Insane of Maryland. This act also explicitly specified that the facility should not be located in Baltimore. On 13 Dec., 1910 the Board of Managers purchased farm land located at Crownsville, Maryland for the sum of $19,000 which had formerly been farmed for willow and tobacco. On 23 May 1910 Dr. Robert Winterode was designated the first Superintendent.

The facility was founded following a 1908 report of "The Maryland State Lunacy Commission" which stated:

"It is with a feeling of shame and humiliation that the conditions which exist in the State among the negro insane are chronicled and known to the public. Righteous indignation cannot help being aroused when one sees or reads of the most horrible cruelties being practiced upon these unfortunates…. The most urgent need at this time is a hospital for the negro insane of Maryland…."

As early as 1899 the Maryland Lunacy Commission in its Annual Report stated

"At present there are no negro insane at the second hospital (Springfield) and the comparatively small number at Spring Grove is a distinct embarrassment to the institution."

Again in its 1900 report it stated:

"The condition of the negro insane at Montevue Hospital at Frederick is shameful and should at once be remedied. The beasts of the field are better cared for than the poor negroes at Montevue."

The first group of 12 patients arrived at Crownsville on 13 March 1911. Patients lived in a work camp located in a willow curing house adjacent to one of the willow ponds. Dr. Winterode worked with them to prepare roads and to harvest the tobacco and willow crops on the property. Additional patients were transferred in July and Sept. 1911. Construction started on the first large building, A Building in Oct., 1912. Patients were used to work on the construction of the hospital in addition to working in its day to day functions. As reported in the State Lunacy Commission Report of Dec.,1912, patients worked as "hod carriers" and assistants to electricians and plumbers. Construction necessitated that they push "barrows of concrete up a tramway three and a half stories in height." They excavated "10000 cubic yards of earth in about 10 weeks." In addition they unloaded 238 cars of cement, stone and other building materials. "The laundry work for the patients is done by two adult males and an epileptic imbecile 10 years of age who has been taught to feed the ringer(sic) and at which he has become quite adept. During the past year (1912) these three have washed and ironed over 40,000 pieces."

Within a short time smallpox and scarlet fever struck the patients. Water quality was also cited as a problem in those early years. Tuberculosis was a constant threat and is mentioned in the annual reports of those early years because there was no real provision for the isolation of the patients except in the summer months when there was a temporary open building for them. According to the Annual and Biennial Report of the State Lunacy Commission 1914-1915 in the section on Crownsville Hospital it was reported that "The percentage of deaths based upon admissions(268 patients) was 38.43. The percentage of deaths calculated upon admissions due to tuberculosis was 29.85. The percentage of deaths based upon average attendance was 32.21." Tuberculosis remained a problem for many years.

It was not until 1939 that the Commissioner of Mental Hygiene announced: "The opening at Springfield State Hospital of a separate building for the care of mental patients suffering from tuberculosis is one of the outstanding achievements of 1939. In this building all patients from Spring Grove, Springfield and Eastern Shore State Hospital who are suffering from tuberculosis and who represent a danger to other patients or who need special treatment will be cared for." Excluded from this new, active treatment program at the all-white Springfield Hospital Center were the African/American Crownsville TB patients. On 29 Oct. 1915, two hundred Baltimore City patients were transferred from Bay View (now Johns Hopkins Hospital). This transfer was made in five special railway cars.

In 1920 with a patient census of 521 there were two physicians including the superintendent. There were also 17 nurses and attendants, 1 social worker and 18 other help. The data from the 1920 U.S.Census report has the average age of Crownsville patients at 42 years. The youngest was 14 years and there were three patients in their eighties. In the occupations’ section of the report 68% were listed as hol

Ruined Barn

Ruined Barn
An old dairy barn on the grounds of the former Crownsville State Hospital (Maryland) The wikpedia article on this institution is fascinating:

The Crownsville Hospital Center is a former psychiatric hospital located in Crownsville, Maryland.

The facility was enabled by an act of the Maryland General Assembly on 11 April 1910 as the Hospital for the Negro Insane of Maryland. This act also explicitly specified that the facility should not be located in Baltimore. On 13 Dec., 1910 the Board of Managers purchased farm land located at Crownsville, Maryland for the sum of $19,000 which had formerly been farmed for willow and tobacco. On 23 May 1910 Dr. Robert Winterode was designated the first Superintendent.

The facility was founded following a 1908 report of "The Maryland State Lunacy Commission" which stated:

"It is with a feeling of shame and humiliation that the conditions which exist in the State among the negro insane are chronicled and known to the public. Righteous indignation cannot help being aroused when one sees or reads of the most horrible cruelties being practiced upon these unfortunates…. The most urgent need at this time is a hospital for the negro insane of Maryland…."

As early as 1899 the Maryland Lunacy Commission in its Annual Report stated

"At present there are no negro insane at the second hospital (Springfield) and the comparatively small number at Spring Grove is a distinct embarrassment to the institution."

Again in its 1900 report it stated:

"The condition of the negro insane at Montevue Hospital at Frederick is shameful and should at once be remedied. The beasts of the field are better cared for than the poor negroes at Montevue."

The first group of 12 patients arrived at Crownsville on 13 March 1911. Patients lived in a work camp located in a willow curing house adjacent to one of the willow ponds. Dr. Winterode worked with them to prepare roads and to harvest the tobacco and willow crops on the property. Additional patients were transferred in July and Sept. 1911. Construction started on the first large building, A Building in Oct., 1912. Patients were used to work on the construction of the hospital in addition to working in its day to day functions. As reported in the State Lunacy Commission Report of Dec.,1912, patients worked as "hod carriers" and assistants to electricians and plumbers. Construction necessitated that they push "barrows of concrete up a tramway three and a half stories in height." They excavated "10000 cubic yards of earth in about 10 weeks." In addition they unloaded 238 cars of cement, stone and other building materials. "The laundry work for the patients is done by two adult males and an epileptic imbecile 10 years of age who has been taught to feed the ringer(sic) and at which he has become quite adept. During the past year (1912) these three have washed and ironed over 40,000 pieces."

Within a short time smallpox and scarlet fever struck the patients. Water quality was also cited as a problem in those early years. Tuberculosis was a constant threat and is mentioned in the annual reports of those early years because there was no real provision for the isolation of the patients except in the summer months when there was a temporary open building for them. According to the Annual and Biennial Report of the State Lunacy Commission 1914-1915 in the section on Crownsville Hospital it was reported that "The percentage of deaths based upon admissions(268 patients) was 38.43. The percentage of deaths calculated upon admissions due to tuberculosis was 29.85. The percentage of deaths based upon average attendance was 32.21." Tuberculosis remained a problem for many years.

It was not until 1939 that the Commissioner of Mental Hygiene announced: "The opening at Springfield State Hospital of a separate building for the care of mental patients suffering from tuberculosis is one of the outstanding achievements of 1939. In this building all patients from Spring Grove, Springfield and Eastern Shore State Hospital who are suffering from tuberculosis and who represent a danger to other patients or who need special treatment will be cared for." Excluded from this new, active treatment program at the all-white Springfield Hospital Center were the African/American Crownsville TB patients. On 29 Oct. 1915, two hundred Baltimore City patients were transferred from Bay View (now Johns Hopkins Hospital). This transfer was made in five special railway cars.

In 1920 with a patient census of 521 there were two physicians including the superintendent. There were also 17 nurses and attendants, 1 social worker and 18 other help. The data from the 1920 U.S.Census report has the average age of Crownsville patients at 42 years. The youngest was 14 years and there were three patients in their eighties. In the occupations’ section of the report 68% were listed as holdin

online pastoral counseling degree

online pastoral counseling degree

Strategic Pastoral Counseling: A Short-Term Structured Model
Therapeutic counseling in a Christian context can be highly effective when it maintains narrowly focused goals in a time-limited setting. The details of this proven model of pastoral counseling are described in this practical guide.
This second edition of Strategic Pastoral Counseling has been thoroughly revised and includes two new chapters. Benner includes helpful case studies, a new appendix on contemporary ethical issues, and updated chapter bibliographies. His study will continue to serve clergy and students well as a valued practical handbook on pastoral care and counseling.